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Welcome to Sound Off where our viewers can post their opinions, ask questions, submit images, or respond to other posts. Veterans Network does not necessarily concur or agree with any or all posts.

Email us at info@veteransnetwork.org
or use our contact form to Sound Off !!

 Sent:  01/14/010 3:30 pm
Canoga Park, Ca. RC.

To those of you that may have good car or a small pick up in good working order we have a veteran that really needs transpo. urgently! ! You may donate it to Veterans Network.org and recieve a tax credit for it.
Thank you.
comments

 Sent:  11/20/09 2:30 pm
RC Frazier Park Ca.
So this clunker of a house is still working on the Act.
What is taking so long?

Does this Act included
"Blue Water and Air Flights" over Vietnam as presumed exposure.
John, Navy
Yes it does included "flights over" and "blue water"..
but congress spends to much time on trivial legislation like should we spend
two thousand dollars on the out house behind the veterans tennis court in
Sebomook Me
TCH Col. Ret. USF
comments

 Sent:  From JC, Natick Mass.
09/01/09 8:00 am


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LL-0mdEg0U4&feature=related
comments

 Sent:  set by a good friend, take a look.
08/29/09 Milford Conn.
If this does not launch cut and paste up in your "Nav" Bar.

http:///bit.ly/Zy3xz
comments

 Sent:  name: Noel Reyes
phone: 817-948-3632
email: reyescorp@yahoo.com
branch: Army
mailing list: N
comments: Following is information that I have send The VA in Waco, Texas
and my Congressman. I have been Diagnosed many years ago with jungle rot
and tinnitus, I have seen a private doctor and also have been sent the
Dallas VA, where they also agree on the Jungle rot and tinnitus but they
say I did get this in VietnamI am running out of options please tell me
what I can do.
Thank You Very Much,
Noel Reyes
July 28, 2009
Congressman Joe Barton:
This letter is in reference to an incident at the office of Honorable Joe
Barton, on July 27, 2009. In a recent visit your office, I stopped by to
discuss an open claim with anticipation of obtaining some help - with a
matter relating to veterans benefits.
I arrived with a friend, Mr. Michael Martinez. After the visit with the
congressional staffer, I was embarrassed with the treatment I received.
Mr. Martinez also made a comment – “what treatment of a constituent!” and
disabled veteran. Needless to say I am very disappointed.
The congressional staffer said that they were very busy. As there was
not a soul was seated in the waiting room – I thought it was odd – I was
being brushed off.
She said the congressional office did not provide assistance to
constituents with their claims, but to merely assemble paperwork and
forward it, with out reading or reviewing it – yet she sated they were
busy “working a case” – so to me it didn’t make sense.
I did not have an appointment the day I arrived, and since she indicated
they were so busy, I asked if I could make an appointment to see Miss.
Rollins, and the staffer replied “NO”.
I am shocked and dismayed on how that congressional staff office works.
Documentation cut and pasted (see below), from the honorable congressman’s
website clearly states how his congressional office is available to his
constituency for matters in assisting “in dealings with a federal
agencies.”
I am a Vietnam Veteran that has been trying to get disability for service
related concerns for a few years, and the “red taped” discussed above now
appears to be a practice at this regional office.
I would appreciate the opportunity to have a discussion with a
congressional staffer dedicated to helping me and willing to listen to my
case to ensure my case is treated fairly and expeditiously based on
evidence presented.
Help with Federal Agencies
Information including FAQs and contact information for those who need
further assistance in their dealings with a federal agency or office. One
of the most important services we provide is assisting when you are having
trouble cutting through the red tape of the federal government. Although
we cannot order an agency to decide a matter in your favor, we can ensure
that your case is treated fairly and expeditiously. The staff in my
district offices are dedicated to helping you with matters relating to
federal entitlements, federal pensions, immigration problems, military
benefits, Social Security claims, veterans benefits, and other matters.
Before we can help you, we need your permission to look into your case.
Please print and fill out this release form . Once you have signed the
form, please fax a copy and mail the original to my Arlington office .
Note, no inquiries can be made without your written consent.
Veterans
Problems with veterans benefits, eligibility determinations, VA home
loans, and replacements of medals earned
Sincerely,
Noel Reyes
To whom it may concern:
This letter is in reply to the letter from the VA where my claim for
tinnitus and jungle rot was denied.
The information was put together to show that my tinnitus and jungle rot
happened in Vietnam and not in the states.
I do not content that my tinnitus was cause by military noise, look at the
factual circumstances stated below. In all the letters that I have written
and all the technicians, examiners and or doctors that I have seen, I have
never changed my contention. There is no evidence that shows that I had
jungle rot or tinnitus when I went to VIETNAM.
MILITARY SERVICE:
FACT: My DD214 indicates an honorable discharge from the Military
FACT: According to my DD214 my MOS is 11B = infantry
FACT: According to Military records I was in Vietnam in 1970
FACT: As I mentioned before, I carried the M-60 for 91/2 months with a
decibel of 160, every body else carried the M-16 rifle with a decibel
level of 157. Each one of us carried one M72, a claymore mine for the
perimeter , two hand grenades and a flare for the NDP(night defense
position) I handled the claymore mines and hand grenade a few times.
FACT: According to my medals (Combat infantry badge, Army commendation,
air medals etc.) I was in combat. We also did not get a medal for every
firefight. We used real weapons as mentioned below. It was a real war –
58,196 of us died in Vietnam and there were a lot of casualties.
FACT: I was in the 1/12 Calvary Infantry airmobile division, this means
that we were transported by Huey Helicopter to and out of the jungle.
FACT: The Huey had two M-60 machine guns, one on either side, they would
fire them when we landed on the LZ (landing zone) and when we left the LZ.
FACT: I was in different Fire support bases while in Vietnam.
FACT: At the firebases we had 105 MM Howitzer and mortars to support the
ground troops in the jungle. When we were at the base we slept about 20
feet away from the artillery and mortars. The 105’s were fired all night
into the jungle; they called it, to harass the enemy.
FACT: The Huey Helicopter had two M-60 machine guns, one on either side,
they would fire into the jungle for recon when we landed on the LZ
(landing zone) and when we left the LZ.
NOISE LEVELS – DECIBALS - I cannot attach the information, but it can all
be found in the internet.
M-60 -------------------160
M-16 -------------------157
105MM Howitzer----------183
M72A3 ------------------182
Mortar -----------------185
Huey -------------------102.9
Hand grenade -----------64.3
We were not required to wear or were issued any kind of noise protection
of any kind while serving in Vietnam….
NON-MILITARY: History during and after college.
I started college around 1972 to 1975 associates 1975to 1978 B.S. After
College I have worked in offices.
I am not in agreement with the VA decision regarding my case.
I’m requesting a re-evaluation into my, “currently open” case and at this
point, I am frustrated with their findings.
All available scientific evidence indicates, hearing loss is evident with
“service connected” activity during my tour of duty in Viet Nam.
I am enclosing this documentation for your evaluation and will be happy to
discuss this evidence.
Since the evaluation board has not returned a decision based on credible
evidence – I am disheartened at the prospect of them reaching a favorable
conclusion with the resubmission.
I therefore respectfully request your assistance with this matter.
Respectfully,
Noel Reyes
July 28, 2009
Congressman Joe Barton:
This letter is in reference to an incident at the office of Honorable Joe
Barton, on July 27, 2009. In a recent visit your office, I stopped by to
discuss an open claim with anticipation of obtaining some help - with a
matter relating to veterans benefits.
I arrived with a friend, Mr. Michael Martinez. After the visit with the
congressional staffer, I was embarrassed with the treatment I received.
Mr. Martinez also made a comment – “what treatment of a constituent!” and
disabled veteran. Needless to say I am very disappointed.
The congressional staffer said that they were very busy. As there was
not a soul was seated in the waiting room – I thought it was odd – I was
being brushed off.
She said the congressional office did not provide assistance to
constituents with their claims, but to merely assemble paperwork and
forward it, with out reading or reviewing it – yet she sated they were
busy “working a case” – so to me it didn’t make sense.
I did not have an appointment the day I arrived, and since she indicated
they were so busy, I asked if I could make an appointment to see Miss.
Rollins, and the staffer replied “NO”.
I am shocked and dismayed on how that congressional staff office works.
Documentation cut and pasted (see below), from the honorable congressman’s
website clearly states how his congressional office is available to his
constituency for matters in assisting “in dealings with a federal
agencies.”
I am a Vietnam Veteran that has been trying to get disability for service
related concerns for a few years, and the “red taped” discussed above now
appears to be a practice at this regional office.
I would appreciate the opportunity to have a discussion with a
congressional staffer dedicated to helping me and willing to listen to my
case to ensure my case is treated fairly and expeditiously based on
evidence presented.
Help with Federal Agencies
Information including FAQs and contact information for those who need
further assistance in their dealings with a federal agency or office. One
of the most important services we provide is assisting when you are having
trouble cutting through the red tape of the federal government. Although
we cannot order an agency to decide a matter in your favor, we can ensure
that your case is treated fairly and expeditiously. The staff in my
district offices are dedicated to helping you with matters relating to
federal entitlements, federal pensions, immigration problems, military
benefits, Social Security claims, veterans benefits, and other matters.
Before we can help you, we need your permission to look into your case.
Please print and fill out this release form . Once you have signed the
form, please fax a copy and mail the original to my Arlington office .
Note, no inquiries can be made without your written consent.
Veterans
Problems with veterans benefits, eligibility determinations, VA home
loans, and replacements of medals earned
Sincerely,
Noel Reyes
To whom it may concern:
This letter is in reply to the letter from the VA where my claim for
tinnitus and jungle rot was denied.
The information was put together to show that my tinnitus and jungle rot
happened in Vietnam and not in the states.
I do not content that my tinnitus was cause by military noise, look at the
factual circumstances stated below. In all the letters that I have written
and all the technicians, examiners and or doctors that I have seen, I have
never changed my contention. There is no evidence that shows that I had
jungle rot or tinnitus when I went to VIETNAM.
MILITARY SERVICE:
FACT: My DD214 indicates an honorable discharge from the Military
FACT: According to my DD214 my MOS is 11B = infantry
FACT: According to Military records I was in Vietnam in 1970
FACT: As I mentioned before, I carried the M-60 for 91/2 months with a
decibel of 160, every body else carried the M-16 rifle with a decibel
level of 157. Each one of us carried one M72, a claymore mine for the
perimeter , two hand grenades and a flare for the NDP(night defense
position) I handled the claymore mines and hand grenade a few times.
FACT: According to my medals (Combat infantry badge, Army commendation,
air medals etc.) I was in combat. We also did not get a medal for every
firefight. We used real weapons as mentioned below. It was a real war –
58,196 of us died in Vietnam and there were a lot of casualties.
FACT: I was in the 1/12 Calvary Infantry airmobile division, this means
that we were transported by Huey Helicopter to and out of the jungle.
FACT: The Huey had two M-60 machine guns, one on either side, they would
fire them when we landed on the LZ (landing zone) and when we left the LZ.
FACT: I was in different Fire support bases while in Vietnam.
FACT: At the firebases we had 105 MM Howitzer and mortars to support the
ground troops in the jungle. When we were at the base we slept about 20
feet away from the artillery and mortars. The 105’s were fired all night
into the jungle; they called it, to harass the enemy.
FACT: The Huey Helicopter had two M-60 machine guns, one on either side,
they would fire into the jungle for recon when we landed on the LZ
(landing zone) and when we left the LZ.
NOISE LEVELS – DECIBALS - I cannot attach the information, but it can all
be found in the internet.
M-60 -------------------160
M-16 -------------------157
105MM Howitzer----------183
M72A3 ------------------182
Mortar -----------------185
Huey -------------------102.9
Hand grenade -----------64.3
We were not required to wear or were issued any kind of noise protection
of any kind while serving in Vietnam….
NON-MILITARY: History during and after college.
I started college around 1972 to 1975 associates 1975to 1978 B.S. After
College I have worked in offices.




comments

 Sent:  06/19/09 9:00 am
email: seansarahfoord@tiscali.co.uk
branch: Air Force
mailing list: N
comments: dear sir i wonder if you can help in a quest i am trying to find my
fathers father he was a pilot in the second world war his name was howard koble (
koeble) and possible flew thunderbolts he met my father mother in kent my dad only
met his birth mother the once and she said he came from pensylvannia usa she always
said he died on d-day but we cannot find truth in this as only six american pilots
died on this day i am only trying to put a face to name to close this long and sad
story my dads mother died with this secret of knowing whom and where she met my
grandfather and i was hoping you might be able to help
yours Sean Foord
comments

 Sent:   kyle tucker 05/27/09 7:30 am
email: kylewentz69@aol.com

comments: hello i am hoping you can help me with a question, i am trying
yo find out who my grandmother is. she was in the U.S Army Airborne. when
i was younger i was given a ring that she received, but it seems like no
one in the family reallys knows anything about her. her name is Effie May
Tucker please help me, you can contact me by email at kylewentz69@aol.com
comments

 Sent:  /TheseAreMyCredentials.pps
comments

 Sent:  Stepping to the Plate, 12/23/08 11:01

Legendary stuntman and martial artist "Judo" Gene LeBell, left, and wife Midge, second from right, sign personal greeting cards for American troops in Iraq. Helping, was Grace McClung, second from left, whose brother is stationed in Iraq with the Marine Corps, and Joan Kosche, store owner, at Valley Martial Arts Supply in North Hollywood, Ca. LeBell was including custom Gene LeBell and Stunts Unlimited patches, Gene LeBell grappling books, and items that the troops could use. (Hans Gutknecht/Staff Photographer).


imagescomments

 Sent:  12/17/08 9:00 am

10 Green Berets to Receive Silver Star for Afghan Battle

Members of the Operational Detachment Alpha 3336 of the 3rd Special Forces Group endured a nearly seven-hour battle on a mountainside in Afghanistan's Nuristan province on April 6.
Members of the Operational Detachment Alpha 3336 of the 3rd Special Forces Group endured a nearly seven-hour battle on a mountainside in Afghanistan's Nuristan province on April 6. (Courtesy Of Maj. Emanuel Ortiz Cruz)
Staff Sgt. Seth E. Howard
Staff Sgt. Seth E. Howard (Courtesy Of U.s. Army Public Affairs - Courtesy Of U.s. Army Public Affairs)
Staff Sgt. Ronald J. Shurer
Staff Sgt. Ronald J. Shurer (Courtesy Of U.s. Army Public Affairs - Courtesy Of U.s. Army Public Affairs)
Capt. Kyle M. Walton
Capt. Kyle M. Walton (Courtesy Of U.s. Army Public Affairs - Courtesy Of U.s. Army Public Affairs)
After jumping out of helicopters at daybreak onto jagged, ice-covered rocks and into water at an altitude of 10,000 feet, the 12-man Special Forces team scrambled up the steep mountainside toward its target -- an insurgent stronghold in northeast Afghanistan.
"Our plan," Capt. Kyle M. Walton recalled in an interview, "was to fight downhill."
But as the soldiers maneuvered toward a cluster of thick-walled mud buildings constructed layer upon layer about 1,000 feet farther up the mountain, insurgents quickly manned fighting positions, readying a barrage of fire for the exposed Green Berets.
A harrowing, nearly seven-hour battle unfolded on that mountainside in Afghanistan's Nuristan province on April 6, as Walton, his team and a few dozen Afghan commandos they had trained took fire from all directions. Outnumbered, the Green Berets fought on even after half of them were wounded -- four critically -- and managed to subdue an estimated 150 to 200 insurgents, according to interviews with several team members and official citations.
Today, Walton and nine of his teammates from Operational Detachment Alpha 3336 of the 3rd Special Forces Group will receive the Silver Star for their heroism in that battle -- the highest number of such awards given to the elite troops for a single engagement since the Vietnam War.
That chilly morning, Walton's mind was on his team's mission: to capture or kill several members of the Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin (HIG) militant group in their stronghold, a village perched in Nuristan's Shok Valley that was accessible only by pack mule and so remote that Walton said he believed that no U.S. troops, or Soviet ones before them, had ever been there.
But as the soldiers, each carrying 60 to 80 pounds of gear, scaled the mountain, they could already spot insurgents running to and fro, they said. As the soldiers drew closer, they saw that many of the mud buildings had holes in the foot-thick walls for snipers. The U.S. troops had maintained an element of surprise until their helicopters turned into the valley, but by now the insurgent leaders entrenched above knew they were the targets, and had alerted their fighters to rally.
Staff Sgt. Luis Morales of Fredericksburg was the first to see an armed insurgent and opened fire, killing him. But at that moment, the insurgents began blasting away at the American and Afghan troops with machine guns, sniper rifles and rocket-propelled grenades -- shooting down on each of the U.S. positions from virtually all sides.
"All elements were pinned down from extremely heavy fire from the get-go," Walton said. "It was a coordinated attack." The insurgent Afghan fighters knew there was only one route up the valley and "were able to wait until we were in the most vulnerable position to initiate the ambush," said Staff Sgt. Seth E. Howard, the team weapons sergeant.
Almost immediately, exposed U.S. and Afghan troops were hit. An Afghan interpreter was killed, and Staff Sgt. Dillon Behr was shot in the hip.
"We were pretty much in the open, there were no trees to hide behind," said Morales, who with Walton pulled Behr back to their position. Morales cut open Behr's fatigues and applied pressure to his bleeding hip, even though Morales himself had been shot in the right thigh. A minute later, Morales was hit again, in the ankle, leaving him struggling to treat himself and his comrade, he said. Absent any cover, Walton moved the body of the dead Afghan interpreter to shield the wounded.
Farther down the hill in the streambed, Master Sgt. Scott Ford, the team sergeant, was firing an M203 grenade launcher at the fighting positions, he recalled. An Afghan commando fired rocket-propelled grenades at the windows from which they were taking fire, while Howard shot rounds from a rocket launcher and recoilless rifle.
Ford, of Athens, Ohio, then moved up the mountain amid withering fire to aid Walton at his command position. The ferocity of the attack surprised him, as rounds ricocheted nearby every time he stuck his head out from behind a rock. "Typically they run out of ammo or start to manage their ammo, but . . . they held a sustained rate of fire for about six hours," he said.
As Ford and Staff Sgt. John Wayne Walding returned fire, Walding was hit below his right knee. Ford turned and saw that the bullet "basically amputated his right leg right there on the battlefield."
Walding, of Groesbeck, Tex., recalled: "I literally grabbed my boot and put it in my crotch, then got the boot laces and tied it to my thigh, so it would not flop around. There was about two inches of meat holding my leg on." He put on a tourniquet, watching the blood flow out the stump to see when it was tight enough.
Then Walding tried to inject himself with morphine but accidentally used the wrong tip of the syringe and put the needle in this thumb, he later recalled. "My thumb felt great," he said wryly, noting that throughout the incident he never lost consciousness. "My name is John Wayne," he said.
Soon afterward, a round hit Ford in the chest, knocking him back but not penetrating his body armor. A minute later, another bullet went through his left arm and shoulder, hitting the helmet of the medic, Staff Sgt. Ronald J. Shurer, who was behind him treating Behr. An insurgent sniper was zeroing in on them.
Bleeding heavily from the arm, Ford put together a plan to begin removing the wounded, knowing they could hold out only for so long without being overrun. By this time, Air Force jets had begun dropping dozens of munitions on enemy positions precariously close to the Green Berets, including 2,000-pound bombs that fell within 350 yards.
"I was completely covered in a cloud of black smoke from the explosion," said Howard, and Behr was wounded in the intestine by a piece of shrapnel.
The evacuation plan, Ford said, was that "every time they dropped another bomb, we would move down another terrace until we basically leapfrogged down the mountain." Ford was able to move to lower ground after one bomb hit, but insurgent fire rained down again, pinning the soldiers left behind.
"If we went that way, we would have all died," said Howard, who was hiding behind 12-inch-high rocks with bullets bouncing off about every 10 seconds. Insurgents again nearly overran the U.S. position, firing down from 25 yards away -- so near that the Americans said they could hear their voices. Another 2,000-pound bomb dropped "danger close," Howard said, allowing the soldiers to get away.
Finally, after hours of fighting, the troops made their way down to the streambed, with those who could still walk carrying the wounded. A medical evacuation helicopter flew in, but the rotors were immediately hit by bullets, so the pilot hovered just long enough to allow the in-flight medic to jump off, then flew away.
A second helicopter came in but had to land in the middle of the icy, fast-moving stream. "It took two to three guys to carry each casualty through the river," Ford said. "It was a mad dash to the medevac." As they sat on the helicopter, it sustained several rounds of fire, and the pilot was grazed by a bullet.
By the time the battle ended, the Green Berets and the commandos had suffered 15 wounded and two killed, both Afghans, while an estimated 150 to 200 insurgents were dead, according to an official Army account of the battle. The Special Forces soldiers had nearly run out of ammunition, with each having one to two magazines left, Ford said.
"We should not have lived," said Walding, reflecting on the battle in a phone interview from Fort Bragg, N.C., where he and the nine others are to receive the Silver Stars today. Nine more Green Berets from the 3rd Special Forces Group will also receive Silver Stars for other battles. About 200 U.S. troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan have received the Silver Star, the U.S. military's third-highest combat award.




 
[Viewer Response] I really liked this post. Can I copy it to my site? Thank you in advance.
[Viewer Response] Hi, cool post. I have been wondering about this topic,so thanks for writing.
[Viewer Response] Makes me proud to be an American. God Bless our fighting heros.

Leonard DeBerry US Army 1974-77
comments

 Sent:  PW 12/08/08 7:30 am
Frazier Park, Ca.

A Christmas Poem:

TWAS THE NIGHT
BEFORE CHRISTMAS,
HE LIVED
ALL ALONE,
IN A ONE BEDROOM
HOUSE MADE OF
PLASTER AND
STONE.

I HAD COME DOWN
THE CHIMNEY
WITH PRESENTS TO
GIVE,
AND TO SEE JUST
WHO
IN THIS HOME DID
LIVE.

I LOOKED ALL
ABOUT,
A STRANGE SIGHT I DID
SEE,
NO TINSEL, NO
PRESENTS,
NOT EVEN A
TREE.

NO STOCKING BY
MANTLE,
JUST BOOTS FILLED
WITH SAND,
ON THE WALL HUNG
PICTURES
OF FAR DISTANT
LANDS.

WITH MEDALS AND
BADGES,
AWARDS OF ALL
KINDS,
A SOBER
THOUGHT
CAME THROUGH MY
MIND.

FOR THIS HOUSE WAS
DIFFERENT,
IT WAS DARK AND
DREARY,
I FOUND THE HOME OF
A SOLDIER,
ONCE I COULD SEE
CLEARLY.

THE SOLDIER LAY
SLEEPING,
SILENT,
ALONE,
CURLED UP ON THE
FLOOR
IN THIS ONE BEDROOM
HOME.

THE FACE WAS SO
GENTLE,
THE ROOM IN SUCH
DISORDER,
NOT HOW I
PICTURED
A UNITED STATES
SOLDIER.

WAS THIS THE
HERO
OF WHOM I'D JUST
READ?
CURLED UP ON A
PONCHO,
THE FLOOR FOR A
BED?

I REALIZED THE
FAMILIES
THAT I SAW THIS
NIGHT,
OWED THEIR LIVES TO
THESE SOLDIERS
WHO WERE
WILLING TO FIGHT.

SOON ROUND
THE WORLD,
THE CHILDREN
WOULD PLAY,
AND GROWNUPS
WOULD CELEBRATE
A BRIGHT
CHRISTMAS DAY.

THEY ALL
ENJOYED FREEDOM
EACH MONTH
OF THE YEAR,
BECAUSE OF THE
SOLDIERS,
LIKE THE ONE LYING
HERE.

I COULDN'T HELP
WONDER
HOW MANY LAY
ALONE,
ON A COLD CHRISTMAS
EVE
IN A LAND FAR FROM
HOME.

THE VERY
THOUGHT
BROUGHT A TEAR TO MY
EYE,
I DROPPED TO MY
KNEES
AND STARTED TO
CRY.

THE SOLDIER
AWAKENED
AND I HEARD A ROUGH
VOICE,
'SANTA DON'T
CRY,
THIS LIFE IS MY
CHOICE;

I FIGHT FOR
FREEDOM,
I DON'T ASK FOR
MORE,
MY LIFE IS MY
GOD,
MY! COUNTRY, MY
CORPS.'

THE SOLDIER
ROLLED OVER
AND DRIFTED TO
SLEEP,
I COULDN'T CONTROL
IT,
I CONTINUED TO
WEEP.

I KEPT WATCH FOR
HOURS,
SO SILENT AND
STILL
AND WE BOTH
SHIVERED
FROM THE COLD
NIGHT'S CHILL.

I DIDN'T
WANT TO LEAVE
ON THAT COLD,
DARK, NIGHT,
THIS GUARDIAN
OF HONOR
SO WILLING TO
FIGHT.

THEN THE SOLDIER
ROLLED OVER,
WITH A VOICE
SOFT AND PURE,
WHISPERED,
'CARRY ON SANTA,
IT'S
CHRISTMAS DAY, ALL IS
SECURE.'

ONE LOOK AT MY
WATCH,
AND I KNEW HE WAS
RIGHT.
'MERRY CHRISTMAS MY
FRIEND,!
AND TO ALL A GOOD
NIGHT.'

This poem was
written by a Marine.

The
following is his request. I think it is
reasonable.....

PLEASE.
Would you do me the kind favor of
sending
this to as many
people as you can? Christmas will be
coming
soon and some credit
is due to our U.S. service men
and
women for our being able
to celebrate these
festivities..
Let's try in
this small way to pay a tiny bit of what
we
owe. Make people stop and
think of our heroes, living
and
dead, who sacrificed
themselves for u s. Please, do
your
small part to plant
this small seed

comments

 Sent:   W C: 12/05/08 9:00 am

comments: I think that our service men and women deserved better than to have their
promotions denied while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Yes I have seen it happened
since the war begun and now is even worst than before. I meet many military wifes
that were very worried because their husbands did not get promoted, and when he came
back home, he had to get out and find a new house and job. This broke my heart every
time I heard that story. well now, I am one of those wife. Yes my husband after
serving almost 25 years for the first time he did not get promoted. He is in Iraq
now serving his second one year tour. Hi has always been and execellent marine, his
records and many awards can attest to that. 2 months into his deployment he got his
first medal for the outstanding job he is doing and now he is waiting for 2 more.
Yes that sounds like a good marine. well not to the marines. He was happy because he
know he was waiting to get promoted to his last rank E-9, He knew he had everything
to make it. Well it seems that he made a mistake because when got promoted to E-8 he
decided to be a Master Sgt. instead of a First sgt. well the first is a field
marine, hands on. He loves his marine, he loves to train them and he always found
pride in fighting along them. Ans the other is a desk marine, yes this is the person
that works in public affairs. Well it seem that his problems was that being a field
marine his fitness reports were signed by the Warrant officer or a Leutenant. Well
according to them his reports would have made a better impression if a Commanding
Officer sign them. It does not matter what the reports say but who signs them, that
makes you a good marine, because my husbands where all outstanding reports. Well now
we know that is not what you but who you that will get you promoted. The sad thing
about it is that I have know of many that have not been promoted while serving in
harms way , but I have known many that have been promoted that have never served a
tour in Iraq or Afghanistan. Like the people that got promoted instead of my husband
all of them are here at home, while He has been gone for almost a year. What about
the moral of our troops? do you think this does not affect them? Can you imagine how
hurt and betrayed they feel? Is this how we thank them and their families for the
sacrifices they have made? Can you imagine how I would feel if something would
happened to my husband, I would be asking my self for what it was not worth it. I
think that someby needs to bring to the attention of the american people that our
military people are being treated unfairly. Is it unfair to ask our military that
when promotions come, it would be fair to give it to the people at war first, as
long as they meet with requirements and have a good military record. And if they do
not give them their promotion don\'t you think is fair they should at least be
allowed to get another contract when their service limitations come. Don\'t you
think that they deserved to have some sort of plan to accomodate the people that do
not get promoted, so when they come home they do not feel like I wasted my life and
risk my life for a nation that did not care for me. Sincerely yours, a very upset
marine wife.

comments

 Sent:  From MZ Palmdale Ca. 11/10/08 9:00 am

Please view this video, it is a very heart warming video of a soldier's return and his amazing

greeting!


Link Text


comments

 Sent:   03/12/08
9:00 am
AF, Army, Frazier Park, Ca.

Bulletin: A rare case of a "celebrity" we can admire.
What a shame she was not recognized until so many
years later! I had never heard of this before.

They don't make them like they used to !
The following is from an Army Aviator:
It was just before Thanksgiving '67 and we were
ferrying dead and wounded from a large GRF west of
Pleiku. We had run out of body bags by noon, so the
Hook (CH-47 CHINOOK) was pretty rough in the back. All
of a sudden, we heard a 'take-charge' woman's voice in
the rear.
There was the singer and actress, Martha Raye,
wearing a SF (Special Forces) beret and jungle
fatigues, with subdued markings, helping the wounded
into the Chinook, and carrying the dead aboard.
'Maggie' had bee n visiting her SF 'heroes' out west.
We took off, short of fuel, and headed to the USAF
hospital pad at Pleiku. As we all started unloading
our pax, an officious Captain said to Martha.... Ms.
Ray, with all these dead and wounded to process, there
will not be time for your show!
To all of our surprise, she pulled on her right
collar and said....Captain, see this silver oak leaf?
I'm a Lt. Col in the US Army Reserve, and on this
collar is a "Caduceus" which means I am a Nurse, with
a surgical speciality.... now, take me to your
wounded. He said, yes ma'am... follow me.
Several times at the Army Field Hospital in
Pleiku, she would 'cover' a surgical shift, giving a
nurse a well-deserved break.
Martha Raye is the only woman buried in the SF (Special Forces) cemetery at Ft. Bragg .
HAND SALUTE!
Link Text
 
[Viewer Response] Maggie came to ouu team in son hoa about 40 km south of tuy hoa in 1964
[Viewer Response] The good guys wear white hats.
Maggie was a good guy.
[Viewer Response] Great story. Have heard many of them. My wife Sandie and I had the privilege of knowing Maggie during the 80's. Dinner at her home every Friday night, board games, watching old movies and just letting her open up and talk about "Her boys" in the military. I have picked up her phone numerous times to hear someone calling from somewhere in the world from some distant military base, or maybe Marge Durante, or Rosemary Clooney. During Christmas I decorated the outside of her home and my wife, the inside. It was an honor to be a part of Col. Maggie's life. She was an original!! We miss her so much and love to tell others how committed she was to "her boys" in the military. She thought the world of all of you!!!
George Steven
comments

 Sent:  02/23/08
9:00 am
JT
FARM KID (NOW AT San Diego MARINE CORPS RECRUIT TRAINING)
Dear Ma and Pa,
I am well. Hope you are. Tell Brother Walt and Brother Elmer the Marine Corps beats working for old man Minch by a mile. Tell them to join up quick before all of the places are filled. I was restless at first because you got to stay in bed till nearly 6 a.m. But I am getting so I like to sleep late.
Tell Walt and Elmer all you do before breakfast is smooth your cot, and shine some things. No hogs to slop, feed to pitch, mash to mix, wood to split, fire to lay. Practically nothing. Men got to shave but it is not so bad, there's warm water. Breakfast is strong on trimmings like fruit juice, cereal, eggs, bacon, etc., but kind of weak on chops, potatoes, ham, steak, fried eggplant, pie and other regular food, but tell Walt and Elmer you can always sit by the two city boys that live on coffee. Their food, plus yours, holds you until noon when you get fed again. It's no wonder these city boys can't walk much. We go on "route marches," which the platoon sergeant says are long walks to harden us. If he thinks so, it's not my place to tell him different. A "route march" is about as far as to our mailbox at home. Then the city guys get sore feet and we all ride back in trucks. The sergeant is like a school teacher. He nags a lot. The Captain is like the school board. Majors and colonels just ride around and frown. They don't bother you none. This next will kill Walt and Elmer with laughing. I keep getting medals for shooting. I don't know why. The bulls-eye is near as big as a chipmunk head and don't move, and it ain't shooting at you like the Higgett boys at home. All you got to do is lie there all comfortable and hit it. Y ou don't even load your own cartridges. They come in boxes. Then we have what they call hand-to-hand combat training. You get to wrestle with them city boys. I have to be real careful though, they break real easy. It ain't like fighting with that ole bull at home. I'm about the best they got in this except for that Tug Jordan from over in Silver Lake . I only beat him once. He joined up the same time as me, but I'm only 5'6" and 130 pounds and he's 6'8" and near 300 pounds dry.
Be sure to tell Walt and Elmer to h urry and join before other fellers get onto this setup and come stampeding in.
Your loving daughter,
Alice
comments

 Sent:  Subject: Fw: The story of Ed > > From an ole military friend: > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Not many know about the person in this story; if you are 65 or older , you may, if you have any recall at all. To me it says we need to be > gratefull for all those serving our country in the Mililtary Service and to pray for their safe return to their families. We need to have empathy > for those families who have lost part of their family.; who have given their life for our safety and well being.Then we Need To Praise God continually for all the Prayers he answers for each of us.I just prayed thanking the Lord for each of you.
"The Story of Old Ed" Every Friday evening, almost without fail, when the sun resembles a giant orange and is starting to dip into the blue ocean Old Ed comes strolling along the beach to his favorite pier. Clutched in his bony hand is a bucket of shrimp.
Ed walks out to the end of the pier, where it seems he almost has the world to himself.
The glow of the sun is a golden bronze now. Everybody's gone, except for a few joggers on the beach. Standing out on the end of the pier, Ed is alone with his thoughts....and his bucket of shrimp. Before long, however, he is no longer alone. Up in the sky a thousand white dots come screeching and squawking, winging their way toward that lanky frame standing there on the end of the pier. Before long, dozens of seagull have enveloped him, their wings fluttering and flapping wildly.
Ed stands there tossing shrimp to the hungry birds. As he does, if you > listen closely, you can hear him say with a smile, "Thank you.Thank you!" In a few short minutes the bucket is empty. But Ed doesn't leave. He stands there lost in thought, as though transported to another time and place. Invariably, one of the gulls lands on his sea-bleached, weather-beaten hat an old military hat he's been wearing for years. When he finally turns around and begins to walk back toward the beach, a few of the birds hop along the pier with him until he gets to the stairs, and then they,t oo, fly away. And old Ed quietly makes his way down to the > end of the beach and on home. If you were sitting there on the pier with your fishing line in the water, Ed might seem like "a funny old duck," as my dad used to say. Or, "a guy that's a sandwich shy of a picnic," as my kids might say. To onlookers, he's just another old codger, lost in his own weird world, feeding the seagulls with a bucket full of shrimp.
To the onlooker, rituals can look either very strange or very empty. They can seem altogether unimportant....maybe even a lot of nonsense. Old folks > often do strange things, at least in the eyes of Boomers and Busters. Most > of them would probably write Old Ed off, down there in Florida. That's too bad. They'd do well to know him better. This is his story: His full name: Eddie Rickenbacker. He was a famous hero back in World War II. On one of his flying missions across the Pacific, he and his seven-member crew went down. Miraculously, all of the men survived, crawled out of their plane, and climbed into a life raft.
Captain Rickenbacker and his crew floated for days on the rough waters of the Pacific. They fought the sun. They fought sharks. Most of all, they fought hunger. By the eighth day their rations ran out. No food. No water. They were hundreds of miles from land and no one knew where they were. They needed a miracle.That afternoon they had a simple devotional service and prayed for a miracle. They tried to nap. Eddie leaned back and pulled his military cap over his nose. Time dragged. All he could hear was the slap of the waves against the raft. Suddenly, Eddie felt something land on the top of his cap. It was a seagull! Old Ed would later describe how he sat perfectly still, planning his next move. With a flash of his hand and a squawk from the gull, he managed to grab it and wring its neck. He tore the feathers off, and he and his starving crew made a meal a very slight meal for eight men of it.
Then they used the intestines for bait. With it, they caught fish, which gave them food and more bait...... and the cycle continued. With that simple survival technique, they were able to endure the rigors of the sea until > they were found and rescued. Eddie Rickenbacker lived many years beyond that ordeal, but he never forgot the sacrifice of that first lifesaving seagull. And he never stopped saying, "Thank you." That's why almost every Friday night he would walk to the end of the pier with a bucket full of shrimp and a heart full of gratitude.

DL
Easton, Conn.
 
[Viewer Response] PS I thought it was Colonel VON Rickenbacker? Am I wrong? Was he German? Regardless, thank you!
[Viewer Response] Wow! Col. Rickenbacker is still alive? How can I shake his hand and thank him? Thank you for your report. I am really awestruck.

comments

 Sent:  08/13/07
3:13 pm
Van Sanderson
branch: Navy

comments:
My name is Vancil Sanderson and in 1966 I was a part of the illegal and
immoral experiments performed on military
personnel on Naval Station Guam, Cocos Island, Guam. A radioactive substance was
being put into our food.
Many years later, 1983, I started having severe health problems. In 1993 I was
forced to apply for SSD and for my service
connection. After 2 years of trying to get my military records, Congresswoman
Barbara Vucanovich assisted me in getting my
records. We found out that the military had purged the records of the experiment on
Cocos Island. Other parts of my records
were also purged. With the purging of my records I was forced to research my
military service to prove my case for disability
compensation and that it is service connected. The following is what I have found
about the island of Guam and it\'s serious
contamination problem.
In 1944 the Battle for Guam was fought. Many men died on both sides. Almost 20,000
people were killed in the battle. About
5,000 US and 15,000 Japanese. The war in the Pacific was coming to a climax. Guam
was a key part on the attack of Japan.
With all the dead on Guam and the war still raging a huge problem arose. Filth Flies
and other disease carrying insects were
multiplying by the billions on all the dead. There weren\'t enough people to do away
with all the bodies to stop the problem. The
answer to the problem was DDT. The island wide use started just after the battle.
The entire island was sprayed by air day
after day, month after month. The use of DDT by air may have gone on for years. DDT
was also used in the disposal of many
of the bodies. The bodies were DDT\'d, wrapped or bagged then DDT\'d, then put in
graves and DDT\'d again. DDT wasn\'t the
only pesticide being used. DDT was used on Guam until it\'s ban.
Herbicides were being used in the building and maintenance of the infrastructure of
Guam. I believe 10 military installations,
both Navy and Airforce, were built right after or during the war. Andersen AFB is
the largest attack base in the world. It was
used in the bombing of Vietnam. There were numerous Navy installations as well, NCS,
Barricada Station, Guam Naval
Complex(6 bases) and Naval Station Guam, Cocos Island. Herbs were used to build
these bases and to maintain them. The
first herbicide used according to WWII veterans was Agent White. Veterans have also
testified to the use of Agent Orange as
early as 1955. Guam was a staging area for Vietnam and was used to store the rainbow
herbs. At least as early as the Korean
war the US was storing the rainbow herbicides on Guam. Agent Purple has been
reported by the DOD as having been stored
there during Korea, for use in Korea. I personnally am in contact with 5 vets who
used AO on Guam in the sixties, the earliest
being 1962 and the latest 1969. Veterans who worked in the storage areas of Guam
have taken pictures of the various
herbicides. They have also written letters in support of the pictures and also
stated they used these herbicides on Guam. It was
even used in aerial spraying according to veterans.
Silvex,2,4,5-TP, another of these herbicides can be found throughout the drinking
water system of Guam, as well as 2,4-D,
2,4,5-T, 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The Northern Guam Lens Aquifer was the sole-source drinking
water aquifer for Guam and is
contaminated by every substance the military had to offer and some. Fena Lake is the
water supply for the Navy and the Fleet
that ported on Guam. The lake is surrounded by the Naval Magazine and is
contaminated. The only way for these substances
to get into the Northern Guam Lens Aquifer and Fena Lake is through military use or
disposal. The aquifer, at the north end of
the island, was contaminated by the 3 bases that sit atop it, Andersen AFB, NCS and
NAS. The first year tested for Silvex in
the aquifer was 1983 at the NCS wells. Silvex, which can contain more dioxin than
Agent Orange, tested high at .21ppm. .05
is the MCL for Silvex.
Dioxin, the main substance of concern in these herbicides, can be found all over the
island. The highest amount in the world
I have been able to find is on Andersen AFB. 19,000ppm in the soil. Higher than
anywhere in Vietnam. This amount
represents, not just dioxin from herbicides, but from the disposal of dioxin forming
substances by burning. Burning substances
like oil, organochlorine pesticides like DDT, fuels, PCB\'s and a host of others.
These burning ponds were on Navy bases as
well. Wind patterns I have looked at for the island of Guam, would have been sending
dioxin all over the island. During
Vietnam and after the amounts must have been astronomical. I know PCB\'s are dioxin
forming when burned and the island of
Guam was not allowed to ship PCB\'s off island until 1993 or 94 per the EPA. What
this means is that for years this substance
and many more were disposed of on Guam. It didn\'t change until the EPA came into
being and it wasn\'t until 1978 the military
complex of Guam found they had a very serious problem with contamination. Especially
in the drinking water.
What I have tried to describe is a very small island with a huge military presence.
Pesticides were used in all facets of the
military, especially on these pacific islands. Insecticides like DDT were used
against the disease carrying insects. Herbicides like
Agent Orange, Silvex and 2,4-D were used against the plant life. This is the way the
military did things. Guam is just the worst
case scenario.
Next I found, starting with the Nuclear Weapons testing in the Pacific, Operation
Crossroads, that Guam was used as a
staging area. Guam between 1946 and the end of the testing, 1963, was a part of the
radiation zone for the testing in the
Pacific. It was also being used as a decontamination site for the ships of the
testing. Apra Harbor and Cocos Lagoon were the
areas I found that were being used. (Cocos Island and lagoon tests high for
pcb\'s,265 times allowed and for Sr89 and 90 at
4121ppm on the base).Guam was also a storage area for contaminated munitions from
the testing. Guam would have been
receiving radiation from the bomb testing by way of water, air and contaminants from
the storage and decontamination. I would
like to take a quote from the \"Blue Ribbon Panel Committee Action Report\" on
Guam.\"What was perpetrated against this
region was the largest ecological disaster in human history. This disaster was no
less than the detonation of over 108,000
kilotons of nuclear explosive directly up jet stream of Guam. The amount of
contamination was 42 times the approximately 150
million curiesreleased as a result of testing in the United States of America.\" The
report indicates that significant amounts of
fallout from the testing existed until about 1974. I know the US Government had the
Univ. of Washington testing the food
supply, water and some vegetation from 1954 to about 1979. They have some of the
samples archived. Other ways for
radioactive contamination would have also come from the decontamination of planes.
As I have said Guam was a part of the
radiation zone and planes monitoring the bomb blasts followed and measured the
fallout. The planes got pretty hot and some
times the planes had to sit on the runway area to cool down before decontamination.
This runoff from the planes was ending up
in the aquifer as well. Radiation contamination was a fact on Guam and it had many
sources.
Next is the contamination to the aquifer by way of military procedures or the way
things were done for the time. The
number one contamination problem for the military on Guam may have been TCE. Or it
would be better stated that the
synergistic effect of all the substances may be the big problem. Whatever way you
look at it, it adds up to a lot of
contamination of the most toxic substances the military uses. And it was running off
unabated into the water supply for Guam
and the fleet for at least 34 years. Feb. 1978 Andersen AFB, Guam, the airforce
finds it has a serious problem with TCE
contamination to the water supply. The 11 wells of the Marbo Complex are
contaminated, some severely. TCE continued to
be a serious problem for the aquifer even after the discovery. The military\'s only
way to combat the problem was to dilute the
wells. Take the water from less contaminated wells and mix with the severely
contaminated wells before consumption. Levels
even then were high. Dilution isn\'t a an efficient way to clean drinking water. At
best it\'s a bandaid solution, if that. It wasn\'t until
about 1995 that the technology was developed and installed on Guam. This technology
was developed for the military at
McClelland AFB, Calif in the late 80\'s.
While stationed on NCS, Guam in 1966 and 67 I could taste, see and smell what
appeared to be a solvent in the drinking
water. According to ATSDR the level of TCE would have to have been at least
1,000,000ppb. What this means is that all the
levels of contaminants in the drinking water would have been much higher than
indicated by the DOD. With my personal
knowledge and hearings held before congress in Nov. 1987, this shows the
contamination was extrememly high.(Page 84 of
the Mike Synar hearings before congress explains that all the readings released by
the airforce for Andersen AFB were diluted
figures and didn\'t represent the true contamination levels of the aquifer)GAO
reports for Guam support the dilution and when it
started. In the GAO April and May 1987 reports it is stated that base commanders
immediately started dilution upon the
discovery of the contamination. It was discovered in Feb. 1978 and all readings
after this time, Mar. 1978 on, were diluted.
What this means is that there was a lot of contamination going into the aquifer and
ultimately being consumed by military and
civilian personnel.The TCE levels were a huge problem because of all the types of
uses and how the military did things during
Vietnam and before. TCE was the solvent of choice and used to washdown planes after
each flight. It was a mixture of TCE
and water. Andersen AFB was the largest attack base in the world and all flights for
B-52\'s attacking Vietnam originated and
ended on Guam in 1965, 66 and into 67. This represents 1000\'s of flights just for
the B-52\'s. After each sortie the planes are
washed down with the TCE mixture. The mixture then went into the drainage system and
into the aquifer. Andersen\'s drainage
system and numerous dumby wells (Dumby wells were punched all over Andersen for
better recharge of the aquifer. May be
as many as 200 of these wells) carried all the contamination directly to the
aquifer. Any contamination that didn\'t make it to the
drainage systems would have been runoff by the heavy rainfalls by way of the many
sinkholes and dumby wells on the island.
These sinkholes provided rapid transfer of contaminants from the surface to the
aquifer, per the GAO, and were all over the
island. The military was using some of these sinkholes as dumps. Some drainage
systems were tied directly to the sinkholes and
dumby wells. I would venture to say over 100,000 flights of B-52\'s tookoff from
Andersen. Add in all the other types aircraft
stationed, serviced and overhauled on Andersen and you could have had over a
1,000,000 planes done at Andersen just
during Vietnam. Veterans who worked on the flightline also have told me after the
B-52\'s left on a sortie, the bunkers, where all
the prep work for the B-52\'s was done, were sprayed with the TCE mixture. Every
bunker had a drainage system tied to the
main drain for the flightline. TCE was the most widely used solvent for all airforce
operations.
The way the military handled it\'s toxic waste for years, was by dumping or burning
and that was how it was done until the
80\'s. On Guam you have 3 military installations over the Northern Guam Lens
drinking water aquifer. One is Andersen AFB
which is an NPL site. The amount of contamination generated by Andersen during
Vietnam would have been the highest in the
world. All of this had rapid transfer to the aquifer. This is substantiated by the
PHA and bioenvironmental engineering well
reports for Andersen. The PHA shows how high dioxin and other toxics are on
Andersen, the highest amount being
19,000ppm of TCDD in the soil. The bioenvironmental reports show the array of
chemicals. There are many other sites with
high amounts of dioxin. Site No. 31, Chemical Storage No. 4(CS-4), had dioxin rates
as high as 130ppm. This site is
up-aquifer from NCS wells 1 and 1a(are now NCS A and B) The herbicide silvex is in
high amounts in the NCS wells,
.21ppm per GEPA in 1983. Dioxin(2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,4,-D, 2,4,5-T and many more
pesticides and chemicals can be found in
the NCS wells, still today. There can be no drift, because the north end of this
island is all military all the time. Just ocean and
military. And the military is the only one using most of these substances.
The naval installations were also contaminating the aquifer, just not to the extent
of Andersen. NCS and the NAS are
superfund sites. Quite possibly NAS should have been an NPL site. They did things
the same way as Andersen, dump and
burn. Same types of toxic waste. Same washdown procedures that contaminated the
environment. Same creation of dioxin by
burning. Used the same types of insectides and herbicides, for the most part.
Applied and stored them the same. The Navy
was handling the toxic waste just as the airforce was, that was for the times. This
is just the north end of the island and the
contamination to the sole-source drinking water aquifer.
The south end consists of the Guam Naval Complex, less the NAS. The Naval Magazine
surrounds the drinking water
supply, Fena Lake, for the navy and the ships that ported on Guam. The magazine is a
superfund site. All of the insecticides
and herbicides(pesticides) were used in the same manner as other military
installations. The base contaminated the environment
around it including the lake. This lake, during and after WWII, would have been
sprayed with DDT for control of disease
carrying insects. Herbicides were used as well for control of weeds in and around
the lake.
In all, the military is responsible for, and I believe this number is growing, there
are 207 contaminated sites, 28 or more
superfund sites and 2 NPL sites on Guam. The island of Guam is about 30 miles long
by an average of 8 and 1/2 miles wide.
Massive amounts of pesticides were used in the military buildup and maintenance of
the military complex on Guam. After the
complex was built it was expanded and the military controlled about 2/3\'s of the
island at the pinnacle.
There are health problems that coincide with the military buildup, neurodegenerative
disease. It has many names but is best
described by ALS/PDC. Neurodegenerative disease got to epidemic proportions between
WWII and the middle 50\'s for
Guam natives, the Chamorro people. I know the DVA is studying this disease in
military personnel, stationed on Guam, at the
VA center in Reno, Nevada. Same time frame. The study has been slowed due to a high
response by veterans stationed on
Guam. The problem with the study is that it doesn\'t cover a broad enough time
period. The Board of Veterans Appeals(BVA)
has found cases of Guam ALS in military personnel, who were stationed on Guam, as
late as the early 70\'s. These aren\'t the
only health problems associated with Guam. According to David B. Cohen in 2004,
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior
for Insular Affairs, about Guam, \"We see alarmingly high rates of diabetes,
hypertension, obesity and many types of cancer
and other diseases\". I know in the Mike Synar hearings in 1987 the congress was
initiating studies or already had of cancer, for
a base or bases on Guam. I am or have been in contact with maybe as many as 100
veterans, and or family members, and or
friends of these veterans who have these catastrophic illnesses. I have been
contacted by some of the Chamorro people of
Guam who are having numerous health problems. Whole families can be affected with
diseases.
What we have is a small island that was strategic to the military buildup during and
after WWII. Guam is still strategic to the
US. Government document after government document supports the massive contamination
to this island. The military pesticide
manual explains totally how to use these substances and for what. All military
installations on Guam followed the manual. The
rainbow herbs, silvex and DDT were all used or stored on Guam. Veterans confirm the
use of herbs like Agent White, during
and after WWII. Agent Purple was stored on Guam for use in Korea. Agent Orange was
used maybe as early as 1955, but I
know veterans who used AO during the 60\'s and as early as 1962. I saw these
herbicides being used in 1966 and 67. Many
other veterans witnessed the use or used them. Veterans have pictures of the herbs
and the naval yard where they were stored.
DDT was passed out like condoms. If you need it use it. All our forays into the
jungle, we had to use the DDT. Whenever the
bug problem started to pick up, DDT was used on the perimeters and some distance
into the jungle. Pesticides were used
regularly around the barracks.
We have a wide array of pesticides, VOC\'s, Benzene, Toulene, PAH\'s, SVOC\'s,
radionuclide and many other of the most
toxic substances the military uses and all of this contamination was ending up in
the drinking water. Of course there was contact
through the skin and through inhallation upon the disposal and use of these toxics
as well. Then you take and add in the Nuclear
Weapons Testing from 1946 through 1963 and the use of Guam as a staging area for the
testing and it was used for the
decontamination of ships and storage for radiation contaminated munitions and
equipment. You add all this up and there is a
huge contamination problem. The health problems of the people of Guam and military
personnel prove this. The hearings before
Congress prove it. The EPA and GEPA documents prove it. The many GAO reports prove
it. ATSDR proves it. The DOE
and DOD proves it. And last and most importantly veterans and there sworn testimony
prove it.
To support all the documents and all the statements made by me, A professor Luis
Szyfres from the University of Gaum has
come forward and blown the whistle to all the contamination on gaum. Every document
he presents is peer-reviewed. Many of
the documents are the same as in my case. ATSDR, GAO, DOE, DNA and many others. He
is a highly respected scientist in
his field and his field is contamination, at least one of them. His credentials are
impeccable and he\'s studying the contamination
to Guam. He says that civilian and military personnel would have been exposed by the
air that they breathe, the food and the
drinking water. Much of the work he\'s done is for the US Government.
What Guam has is a huge contamination problem with substances like insecticides,
herbicides, vocs, svocs, pcbs, pahs,
other pesticides, solvents, fuels, various radioactive substances like cesium and
strontium 90. All of this was ending up in the
sole-source drinking water aquifer under Andersen AFB, NAS and NCS. All drew their
water from this aquifer. 75% of the
islands water supply is drawn from the aquifer under these bases. Studies have been
done on the cancer rates to military
personnel on Guam, per GAO and Congress. Page 52 of the Mike Synar hearings points
this fact out. Guam was the major
staging area for WWII, Korea, Nuclear Weapons and Viet Nam.
That means the Viet Nam era herbicides were stored and used there. This is supported
by the veterans that used them,
scientists, well reports, GAO, GEPA and EPA reports. The burnsite on Andersen that
has dioxin in soil at 19,000ppm was
used to dispose of pesticides. Herbicides are a pesticide. This is per the 2002
ATSDR report for the site. Although this report
is a Public Health Assessment, it shows what the military was being exposed to on a
daily basis. Dioxin is everywhere on the
base. It was and still is in the drinking water of Guam. I have contacted ATSDR and
they have told me their information only
goes back to about 1989. Most of the contamination already had happened. And before
1978 there was no effort to stop the
contamination because the military says they didn\'t know about it. All of this
supports the fact that military personnel, stationed
on Guam, were contaminated with a wide array of contaminants and sometimes in
massive amounts such as the DDT, radiation
and rainbow herbicides.
Thankyou for your time.
Vancil I. Sanderson
 
[Viewer Response] Hello I am Becky Cunningham, my husband was stationed in Guam 1980 to 1981 he was a healthy young man at the time he joined the Navy took no medication or anything. He started having pancreatitis while he was there and the military said it was due to alcohol but he later ended up with type 2 diabetes hbp and in 2009 was diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer and passed away at the age of 48 the millitary has denied his disabilty. If you should have anymore informnation on people with pancreatic cancer that was sataioned in Guam please either email me at rcunningham@chester.k12.sc.us or call me at 8034824474. Thank you
[Viewer Response] did you ever win your claim with the VA?
[Viewer Response] I was stationed on Guam in 66-67-68 and 69 two times I worked in the bomb dumps and one on the flight line. I remember the I dead foliage espically around the flight line. I also remember the taste of the water was terrible. Lived on base and off, Marboro.

Tom Konieczko
[Viewer Response] I was married to a Marine and was at Camp Pendleton the year it was declared a Superfund site in 1978, the year I gave birth to our daughter at NRMC. I became very ill during the ptrgnancy. Silvex, PCBs, VOCs, metals were found there. High levels of lead in the drinking water also. I now have A neuroendocrine cancer with inoperable right ovarian tumor (Carcinoid cancer), A blood cancer, was CIN 1 cervical cancer, prediabetic, heart problems, migraines, asthma and other medical issues.
[Viewer Response] My dad was stationed on Guam from about 1958 or 59 until 1961 or 62. The ritual, almost every day, was to get home from school and wait for the misquito truck - every kid on base rode their bike behind it and then went to the chiefs club for a soda - I have always wondered what long term effects this might have on me - Jack
[Viewer Response] I was stationed at Naval Communications Station Finegayan(sp), Guam from 1965-67. This was my last duty station before retiring after 20 years of service. I am now approaching 80 years of age and have had numerous health issues over the years, including Diabetes, Melanoma, 3 bouts of bladder cancer and other maladies which I think are related to my tour of duty on Guam.
Carl
[Viewer Response] hi my name Walt i was on guam for a month in 1976 for iwas in the navy aboard a navy ship. Because I got diabetes Mellitus, type 2 i,ve known it about it since 1985 I was diagnosed then.
[Viewer Response] My Dad had boils all over his body while serving in Guam in World War II. At least that is what he thought they were and they lasted for 5 days. It was not written much in his records, but he wtrote my mom and told her. We still have those letters. Half of his records are missing and he has an S on his records and The VA wants to know what he did he the War to have them sealed. We know it is against the law, but we have been having a hard time. He is still living and he has cold sweats and is out of it at times. He was in the 3rd Marine Division and the second wave that entered Guam late 1942 or very early 1943. He was one of the few that survived his platoon. All this is very scary and I wonder if that is the reason he has so many problems.
Sandy Balkin
sbalkin@aol.com
[Viewer Response] i would like to know how much rainbow agents where use on NCS as I was station there from 65 to67 and stood post on the base I know they spray around thee barracks and it smell awful for three or four day and nothing grew
[Viewer Response] I was stationed at Andersen Air Force Base Guam for 18 months in the 1972-73 time frame. I lived in one of the barracks in the Marbo annex and drank the water on a daily basis. In 2004 I was diagnosed with end stage liver disease. Later I lost my kidneys as a result. In 2007 I got a liver and kidney transplant. Do you know if there could be a correlation ?
allen@allenwestbrook.com
[Viewer Response] My Dad was in Japan from \'46-\'47 as part of the occupying force. and then in Japan for R&R or other duties (prisoner escort etc) while fighting in Korea 51-52. He passed away 9 Mar 2008. We are going through the grueling task of getting DIC for his wife (stepmom). He was declared 100% disabled but VA in their wisdom can\'t see a connection to his disability and his death.

Fred
[Viewer Response] Your article is very interesting!! My husband was stationed in Guam during the Vietnam War. He is now 61 years old and having numerous heath problems; skin irritations(sores), digestive and hypertension problem and his liver profiles usually come back abnormal. He filed a claim for VA compensation after hearing about herbicides and pesticides being stored in Guam. His claimed was denied for the following reason; There was no reason in the available evidence of records to establish service connection for his illnesses and that most of his problems occurred 35 years after discharge. He did have problems earlier on but we just didn\'t know until recently they could be caused by the chemicals used in Guam. We plan to appeal the VA\'s denial of his claim. Do you have any suggestions as to how we can prove to the VA that even though he has been out of the service for 30+ years, that his health problems could indeed be service related? Thanks for your help and your very enlighting article.

Betty
[Viewer Response] Dear Vancil,
My name is Sandra Smudzin, born Oct 15 1946, daughter of EMC Walter Stanley Smudzin USN born september 30, 1918 and Theresa Catherine Smudzin, born Oct 31 1925. My father was on Guam in the mid 1950\'s for about one year before my mom and I joined to live with him in a metal building. I remember being sprayed everynight by \"Smokey Joe\" we called him. My dad spent the entire war in the Pacific then on to retire from the Navy after 21 years.
After returning from Guam my mother had to enter a mental hosipital and I began having anxiety problems. I have fibromyalga and other ailments. Loss of energy has been experienced by both my parents and myself. Our dear friend, who lived by us on Guam died of cancer at age 62.Her daughter now 50 has lupis. My mother developed precancerous condition in her throat and was operated on in the early 1960\'s. They also suffer from hypertension, high cholesterol, and mom and I are pre diabetic among other ailments.

The nervous disorders that I have experienced all my life since leaving Guam makes me wonder if they haven\'t something to do with the atomic bomb fall out and poisons. A man on the destroyer the Fletcher saw the bomb(Bravo) near the bikini Island explode from the ship. I believe I was on Guam at the time.

I am so sorry for all the peoples of Guam. The native Islanders were always very kind to us children. They would climb coconut trees and cut the husk and give the juice and meat to us. They would weave us hats to wear. They do not deserve what is happening to them. I have a friend who was exposed to massive ammounts of DDT and it is now DDE in her body. She has no immune system. I have a poor immune system.

I am glad this problem is being brought to light. I was urged to look into it by my Doctor who was a research scientist studing these things.
I am most devistated by what has happened to the native populations in Guam and the area.
Anyone I can help or wants to text me my e-mail is sss445@live.com.
Thank you,
Sandy Smudzin
[Viewer Response] Hello, Am VietNam Vet having served @Tahkli thailand 12/66 - 12/67. Trying to service connect DMII due to direct exposure to herbicides since 2001. Denied at RO, BVA, and is now remanded from Court of Appeals for Veterans. Was in 4252 Strat Wg, (SAC) with HQ at Andersen AFB, Guam. Had occasion to visit Guam during an extensive telecommunications outage. Wondering if I should have approached the claim from this standpoint. Immediately went on medication for Thyroid, cholesterol, and HBP, within a few months of retirement (Aug 1987). Would like to hear from you, if you wouldn\'t mind sharing current info, etc. email: autley@austin.rr.com. Thanks.
[Viewer Response] Dear Vancil,
We once had an activist, former Senator Angel Santos fighting for our rights that the military stole our land and alot of contaminants in our soil. This explains WHY alot of folks being diabetic 2 and other illness. Cancer is a growing problem on our island. I\'ve seen people dying slowly because they can\'t afford the medical cost. It\'ll be nice if the military will offer some assistance towards the medical cost for those who are affected.

Thank you for your comments and I will pass this message to my friends.

a_mesa56@hotmail.com

[Viewer Response] Mr. Sanderson,

This is a very interesting document. I worked for the Navy for over 35 years and served as Safety Specialist/Manager at the Ship Repair Facility, Naval Air Station, Naval Supply Depot, Naval Magazine, Naval Hospital Okinawa Japan, returned and worked at ComNavMar at Naval Station after 1965. I will print it out, highlight some areas that I feel are very important for me and my family.

I came from a family of sixteen (16) children and we have history of diabetes, cholesterol, high blood pressure, etc.

I\'d like to communicate/get back to you soon.

Vicky Taitano, Piti, Guam (671) 888-5064

[Viewer Response] I am currently 45 yrs young. I\'m local & very concerned about these contamination issues. I live in the southern side of the island. I\'ve always thought that we were in the cleaner(contaminant wise) side. Now we understand that the whole lagoon is and has been contaminated for many many years. Just to give you and anyone a quick lesson in the eating habits of the chamorro people when it comes to fish; parrotfish is also eaten raw cooked in lemon juice and salt, unicorn fish, internals eaten after fry or barbeque. These are just a couple ways and examples and the local people have been eating these fish from contaminated waters for years. It is my hope that these issues are brought to light as well and that some type of health test program started and compensation provided to people still alive today, of course all paid by the fedgov\'t because it\'s their mess. I would really like to know the contamination area resulting from the Cocos Island. I see below that the whole lagoon is identified but what data is that based on? I wonder if it is much larger and was spread much more inland due to all the typoons throughout all those years.
[Viewer Response] I was a sailor and civilian on Guam in the mid sixties, late sixties and again in the late seventies. I haven\'t heard of the problem. It doesn\'t surprise me though. With the cost of waste disposal the military would have taken the cheapest route they could. I have experienced health problems in my later years myself. However, these are not associated with the problems described herein. I know Guam is made from coral and is very porus. It will absorb like a dry sponge.
[Viewer Response] I have heard about all this contaminants in Guam, Guam have the most cancer, and dibectic for the size of the island. I know lots of local people die from cancer, very young. In fact my brother is only 50 years old die from cancer.
[Viewer Response] ...and here\'s the federalis blaming the brown tree snake for decimating our island\'s bird population. - poo poo!! Is that why a lot of our people are dying at a young age - 55 - 65? My co-worker who passed away 2004, remembered running behind, along with her village friends in Sinajana, a military jeep that was spraying DDT!!! She died from pancreatic cancer.

HERE COMES THE \"MILITARY BUILDUP\" with their anti-environment construction and disposal of all sorts of waste! God bless our Island of Guam and its people!

Si Yu\'os Ma\'ase\'.
[Viewer Response] Hang in there and don\'t give up; my prayers are with you and all others affected.
[Viewer Response] I am from Guam and have lived there since 1943-1962, then was back there again in 1972-73. Many of my sibblings have developed thyroid, hypertension, and other ailments. Would these contaminants have contributed to our problems.

B. Santos
[Viewer Response] Hi Vancil,
Do you know if they had remainder of agent orange in Korea between 1971-1973.

You may email me at a_mesa56hotmail.com
[Viewer Response] Hi Vancil,
I read your column and it\'s very interesting. I\'m from Guam and alot of the native islanders\' are suffering from diabetic and cancer. I don\'t understand why the military cannot provide those affected on those dates with full medical coverage. Right now their\'s a serious problem about medical coverage on our island. Old folks can\'t afford the premium so they die slowly because our island is too expensive.

[Viewer Response] 4 years ago, my niece and I were walking and touring and enjoying the little shops on Coronado Island, San Diego. My granddaughter caught the attention of a resident and he asked where we were from. I had told him I was visiting from Guam and he just gave me a very peculiar look, he told me he was on Guam during the 50\'s and 60\'s. Moments into our conversation
he told me that he hasn\'t forgotten about his mission out in the Pacific and that he often wondered about the impact of that mission on the nearby islands which included Guam. He said that they were doing tests on the Bikini Islands
which has been proven to be very harmful and that those tests would have affected the air and the surrounding locations. He has carried that on his concience all those years and he asked that I contact the local media on Guam to research this. I mentioned to him that my mother, Grandfather and many of my relatives had died of cancer but didn\'t know what connection it would have to this incident. He sounded so sure that it had some bearing on the tests that were done in the 50\'s and 60\'s. This person retired from the military and lived on Coronado Island. I never got his name although he was so persistent that I bring awareness to this particular military activity. It doesn\'t seem like he would be making this up ..for what? Now that I think abut it, people always comment that we lived on paradise; fresh air, no pollution, no smog, nice sunshine and tropical climate, all the requirements for good health. But where did all this lytico and bodig, and the high rates of cancer and diabetes are coming from? Alot of our food is blamed but chamorro food is so similar to Thai food. I\'m wondering if the Thai and Indonesian people have the same health problems. If not, then this definitely is something to look into. P. June Terlaje
comments

 Sent:  12/07/07
7:24 am

On this day, the day that shall live in infamy, I would like to put out a true and heart felt
THANK- YOU to all veterans who have made this great nation possible. Without the sacrfices made by you and the others you left behind on the beaches, battlefields and in the ocean, this nation could not have prospered and become the most admired nation in the world. What you were called to do is beyond the imagination of most people. You stood up to the challange. Thank you and GOD bless each and everyone!

B Fricks
comments

 Sent:   10/01/07
8:00 am

The Aiel (a warrior culture of his novels) have a proverb saying they will fight the Dark One. Till shade is gone, til water is gone, into the Shadow with teeth bared, screaming defiance with the last breath, to spit in Sightblinderís eye on the Last Day Jordan fought amyloidosis, a degenerative blood disease, to the bitter end. He had stated that he would continue writing, until they nail shut my coffin, I and up until the last days he was dictating passages for his next novel. He never once questioned the Creators decision to take him, or the timing, and the last words from his mouth were to tell his beloved Harriett that he loved her.
Jordan was a graduate of The Citadel of South Carolina, with a degree in physics. He served two tours in Vietnam with the U.S. Army; among his decorations were the Distinguished Flying Cross with bronze oak leaf cluster, the Bronze Star with "V" and bronze oak leaf cluster, and two Vietnamese Gallantry Crosses with palm. A history buff, he also wrote dance and theater criticism and enjoyed the outdoor sports of hunting, fishing, and sailing, and the indoor sports of poker, chess, pool, and pipe collecting.
Jordan had a close relationship with his numerous fans and fan websites. News of Jordan's death quickly spread across the fan sites with fans writing in from around the world to express their grief and best wishes for his family. Jordan had an incredibly close knit group of fans; an article published on Forbes.com summed it up best in describing fans' support of Jordan during his illness: "There are readers, and then there are fans. Readers offer condolences when a favorite author falls ill. Fans offer bone marrow."
We say goodbye to this giant of the writing world and wish him well on his next journey.
“May you shelter in the palm of the Creator’s hand, and may the last embrace of the mother welcome you home.”
PP
Stanta Monica , Ca.
comments

 Sent:  10/06/07
9:00 am

I came across you website while looking up as many things as I can to be more knowledgeable about this war and our Veterans. I have the privilege of working in a nursing & rehab center and have slowly developed relationships with many WWII Vets whom I admire and have the utmost respect for. Being I am a female, much younger and can leave when my work is done many of them put up walls that has taken me some time to chip away. I sit with those that want me around one on one and just listen. These men cannot recall the anniversary or some birth-dates but they can tell me in great detail stories that should be written for the future. I know these men with white hair, shaky writing, using a wheelchair and needing help they probably never imagined they would. But I also know them as hero's. I have told some of their stories to people in my family and seen the tears swell in their eyes as they listened. I wish more of younger America would open their own eyes and see that not many of these great men are left. I was 15 when my brother Paul was born, so I wasn't always around to see him grow. From a young age every year he dressed as a solider for Halloween. I have pictures of him hiding in a bush with his camouflage on and pretending to be serving our country. After failed attempts of trying to talk him out of it, Paul is the baby of our family, he finally did what he always wanted to do and joined the Army. He left in January and trained to be a Combat Medic. Yesterday, 10/05/07, Paul left on the biggest plane he has ever seen to start his 18 hour journey to Kuwait. November 1st he is going into downtown Baghdad to take over a new sector with his unit. My heart breaks knowing this but I am so proud of him and the change I hear in his young voice. Please tell other to never stop supporting our troops they need us, whether they are now fighting as a solider, training to become one or just trying to do simple things in the last fight of their life in a nursing home.
Thank You -
C S
comments

 Sent:  10/03/07
1:15 pm

I just returned form Iraq and I am now discharged. Are there any tips I need as far as finding a Service Officer to help me file a claim. I think I have TBI and PTSD, to the point for it is hard to read or write. My sister is typing this for me right now. Any help would be great.

John G.
Semper Fi
 
[Network Comment] Dear John G.
Help is on its way, have your sister get on our site and click to our Veterans News channel. Once there, scroll to News segments #11, 12, and 13. These segments are a three part discussion on most everything you need to know about finding a Service Officer.
If you need more assistance beyond that, you can contact our affiliate, The National Veterans Foundation. They have a real live voice specialist trained to answer any and all questions you may have. The toll free hotline is 1-888-777-4443. Good luck and welcome home.

Veterans Network
comments

 Sent:  10/03/07
4:30 pm.

MY NAME IS TED GROVER AND MY BROTHER THOMAS WAS KILLED ON FEBRUARY 2, 1969 AT CU
CHI. HE WAS AWARDED 2 PURPLE HEARTS AND A SILVER STAR. SHORTLY AFTER HIS DEATH, I
WAS STATIONED AT FORT DIX, NEW JERSEY AFTER RECEIVING A COMPASSIONATE REASSIGNMENT
FROM THE ARMY. TWO OF THE MEN IN TOM'S SQUAD STOPPED BY TO SEE ME AND I NEVER GOT TO
THANK THEM. iF THE TWO MEN THAT STOPPED BY COULD PLEASE EMAIL ME, I WOULD BE VERY
APPRECIATIVE. ALSO, IF ANYONE WHO KNEW TOM COULD PLEASE CONTACT ME, I WOULD BE VERY
THANKFUL. I APPRECIATE ALL THAT YOU GUYS WENT THROUGH.
IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME, BUT THE MEMORY IS VIVID.
TED GROVER
comments

 Sent:  08/06/07
5:28 pm
Please allow me to introduce the fine work that U.S. Vets does for our
returning Troops and the Veterans of all wars past. I came to U.S. Vets 11 years
ago as a Homeless Alcoholic Veteran of the Viet Nam era who could not even get a
job, my family had disowned me, and I had given up all hope.
Thru the intense program that U.S. Vets has designed I was able to remove my
barriers to success, get employed, stay sober, and return to college for a degree in
Psychology. Best of all though, is my family is now back in my life and are
actually proud of me.
We do the same thing for over 2,100 Veterans Nationwide that we house everyday in
our 10 locations and have been since 1993. We are now gearing up to handle the
Troops that are going to be returning soon. In fact we have quite a few already. Can
you believe that Soldiers that young are coming back to homelessness and no jobs?
We need to get word out that U.S. Vets is here for those coming home. This way no
soldier will fall between the cracks and not get an opportunity for the help we are
here to give them. There is no reason for their lives to ever get as bad as mine
did.
Thank you for your patriotism and I know you will continue to support our Troops!
George Smith (Navy)
Case Manger /Fixed Income
U.S. Vets
Please check out our website and see for yourself the job that we do for our Vets.
www.usvetsinc.org
P.S. Keep in mind that 5% of all Military personnel will return to homelessness.
comments

 Sent:   07/30/07
5:45 pm

Thats pretty good music on this Veterans Radio or I guess its called
Veterans Online Radio. What does Zelda Jones look like, wow what a voice.
She reminds me of the early underground FM radio.
Cover and Concealment is great name for a Veterans Radio Channel and to think this
is internet radio.

Carlos Remirez
Fort Benning Ga.
 
[Viewer Response] Hey Carlos,
I can\'t agree more. This veterans online radio is something us vets have needed for ages.

Gary B./Once upon a time Fort Benning
comments

 Sent:   07/30/07
4:20 pm



Love what you folks have done, with the Veterans Online Radio.
I especially like The Rick and Ross Show and all the Music.

Mark Frazer
Army Vet.
comments

 Sent:  07/16/07
9:15 am

I noticed that your site will be adding radio programing. I think it was refered to as veterans
online radio. Very cool. I can listen to it on my laptop while I am at work.
Semper Fi
Tom
comments

 Sent:  BY: Ben Stein, Open Letter
02/02/2007

Dear Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, National Guard,
Reservists, in Iraq , in the Middle East theater, in Afghanistan , in the
area near Afghanistan , in any base anywhere in the world, and your
families:

Let me tell you about why you guys own about 90 percent of the backbone in
the whole world right now and should be happy with yourselves and proud of
whom you are.

It was a dazzlingly hot day here in Rancho Mirage today. I did small errands
like going to the bank to pay my mortgage, finding a new bed at a price I
can afford, practicing driving with my new 5 wood, paying bills for about
two hours. I spoke for a long time to a woman who is going through a nasty
child custody fight. I got e-mails from a woman who was fired today from her
job for not paying attention. I read about multi-billion-dollar mergers in
Europe, Asia , and the Mideast . I noticed how overweight I am, for the
millionth time. In other words, I did a lot of nothing.

Like every other American who is not in the armed forces family, I basically
just rearranged the deck chairs on the Titanic in my trivial,
self-important, meaningless way.

Above all, I talked to a friend of more than forty-three years who told me
he thought his life had no meaning because all he did was count his money.
And, friends in the armed forces, this is the story of all of America today.
We are doing nothing but treading water while you guys carry on the life or
death struggle against worldwide militant Islamic terrorism. Our lives are
about nothing: paying bills, going to humdrum jobs, waiting until we can go
to sleep and then do it all again. Our most vivid issues are trivia compared
with what you do every day, every minute, every second.

Oprah Winfrey talks a lot about "meaning" in life For her, "meaning" is
dieting and then having her photo on the cover of her magazine every single
month (surely a new world record for egomania). This is not "meaning."

Meaning is doing for others.

Meaning is risking your life for hers.

Meaning is putting your bodies and families' peace of mind on the line to
defeat some of the most evil, sick killers the world has ever known.

Meaning is leaving the comfort of home to fight to make sure that there
still will be a home for your family and for your nation and for free men
and women everywhere.

Look, Soldiers and Marines and Sailors and Airmen and Coast Guardsmen, there
are six billion people in this world. The whole fate of this world turns on
what you people, 1.4 million, more or less, do every day. The fate of
mankind depends on what about 2/100 of one percent of the people in this
world do every day and you are those people. And joining you is every
Policeman, Fireman, and Emergency Medical Technician in the country, also
holding back the tide of chaos.

Do you know how important you are? Do you know how indispensable you are? Do
you know how humbly grateful any of us who has a head on his shoulders is to
you? Do you know that if you never do another thing in your lives, you will
always still be heroes? That we could live without Hollywood or Wall Street
or the NFL, but we cannot live for a week without you?

We are on our knees to you and we bless and pray for you every moment. And
Oprah Winfrey, if she were a size two, would not have one millionth of your
importance, and all of the Wall Street billionaires will never mean what the
least of you do, and if Barry Bonds hits hundreds of home runs it would not
mean as much as you going on one patrol or driving one truck to the Baghdad
airport.

You are everything to us, as we go through our little days, and you are in
the prayers of the nation and of every decent man and woman on the planet.
That's who you are and what you mean. I hope you know that.

Love,

Ben Stein
comments

 Sent:  comments: I am trying find any one that was stationed @ ANDERSON AFB Guam with the
43rd transportation squadron from 1973-1975 or any one that was there durring this
time.Would you have any suggestions as where to look?

5/18/07
9:35 am
RJ
Air Force
 
[Viewer Response] I was assigned TDY to the 43rd Trans Sq from Nov. 1972 to May 1973, if that will help you. I was TDY there from Castle AFB, CA (93rd Transportation Squadron). I have also been looking for someone stationed there at the time I was there for Bullet Shot and Linebacker II.

Contact me at topboom@msn.com perhaps we can help each other?

Ed Jackson
comments

 Sent:   Feb. 16 02/16/07
4:00pm

Worth passing on:

Thought for the day:

In case we find ourselves starting to believe all the anti-American
sentiment and negativity, we should remember England's Prime Minister
Tony Blair's words during a recent interview. When asked by one of his
Parliament members why he believes so much in America, he said:

"A simple way to take measure of a country is to look at how many want
in... And how many want out."

Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you:

1. Jesus Christ
2. The American G. I.

One died for your soul, the other for your freedom.

YOU MIGHT WANT TO PASS THIS ON, AS MANY SEEM TO FORGET BOTH OF THEM.
AMEN
From Tim.
comments

 Sent:   02/12/07
1:02 pm

Hello:

My name is Alicia and I am a junior in high school.
My grandfather is veteran from Vietnam war. I am interested in
US and world history and have found a number of your videos
to be interesting historically. Particularlly the ones about Vietnam.
I hope you will be showing more on that subject in the near
future. Thank you.
 
[Network Comment] 

In response to the Alecia email on 02/12/07

We love history too, and because we do, Veterans Network is
currently planning a multiple part program on the history of
troop deployments in the Vietnam War. Our associate history
specialists are working on it as we speak. Stay tuned and look
for it in spring of 2007.

Keep up the good work and thanks for watching us!

VN
comments

 Sent:  

02/12/07
8:14 am

To Veterans Network:

I was watching one of your video shows on the Eleven
Bravo channel. It was the one were the Vietnam navy vet's
father's funeral was attended by the local VFW post.
I was very moved by that because I to had a funeral experience
with the VFW that was very similiar. Thank you for showing that
peice and I will continue to watch your shows.

Paul Moran
US Army vet
Eugene Or.

 
[Viewer Response] We are honored.
comments

 Sent:   02/09/07
2:15 pm
Dear Sirs
I wanted to tell you about this short film, which was produced by the Norfolk, MA District Attorney's office and highlights the challenges faced by returning combat veterans struggling with PTSD.

Sincerely
SH
comments

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